Sunday, 15 May 2016

More Reviews of Comics From The Birmingham Comic Festival 2016. Part 2: Flintlock and Stephenson's Robot

I intended the reviews to come thick and fast but of course, life intervened. Next on my list to read from the pile of comics I bought from the Birmingham Comic Festival was Steven Tanner's 'Flintlock'. I like one-word titles, and this is a great title for a great concept. What we have here is essentially an anthology of three ongoing stories with three high-concept characters. The first is concerned with 'Lady Flintlock', who is a female highwayman - a highwaywoman - whose identity is gradually revealed by the end of this episode. It's a wonderful adventure story with astonishing attention to period detail from Anthony Summey's art, who is quite a find. I expect to see even greater things from him in the future. Slightly less successful artwise Lorenzo Nicoletta's pages on 'Shanti The Pirate Queen'. Again written by Steve Tanner, this is a nice original concept of a female Indian pirate. There is some really nice character design here in a bloody and brutal tale of piracy on the High Seas. She seems to have a plan, and the appetite is whetted for further adventures. Last up is 'The Clockwork Cavalier', basically a vengeful 18th century robot. The art by Ed Machiavello is reminiscent of 2000AD from years gone by - indeed it's the kind of thing that might have appeared there at one point - and for me it's Steve's most entertaining script of the three. Lettering from Bolt-01 needs a special mention as it works so well here, tying everything together in a stylish fashion. Get it here or you'll have to walk the plank. Also worth investing in while you're there is Steve's anthology 'Bomb Scares', edited by Paul H Birch, a devious and deviant collection of horror stories with an array of art and twists in the tale.

Something else that could easily have appeared in 2000AD once upon a time is 'Stephenson's Robot' by Dave West and Indio! in the main, with various contributions from others in the equally high quality back-up strips that serve to support and deepen the main story. The story concerns itself with a steampunk robot in an alternative Victorian England where Stephenson, Brunel and Babbage became more concerned with creating an artificial man than laying down railway tracks. Over the two full-colour issues published so far, we're gradually revealed the backstory which contains as much black magic as it does steam-powered science, as the robotic hero comes up against bizarre proto-Nazi villains. Dave fills this with humour and his trademark strange concepts, while Indio's artwork is a maddening assault on the senses with a vivid line in exploding heads. This is published by Accent UK and you can get it here. While you're there, do sample their burgeoning array of other titles, one of which is 'The Troll' by Martin Flink, a tale told only in pictures of a young boy who wanders off and encounters - what else? - a troll. It's beautiful and, just like Flink's previous 'Man Of Glass', quite moving. Where MOG made me tear up, The Troll made me smile with its childlike charm.

More Reviews Coming Up...

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